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2016 Empowering Teaching Excellence Conference

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2016 Program

Abby D. Benninghoff, PhD

Associate Professor, Animal Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences

Abby BenninghoffIn 1997, Abby D. Benninghoff received her B.S. with dual majors in Biochemistry and Biology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She then completed her doctoral research in Marine Science, with a specialization in comparative endocrinology, at the University of Texas at Austin in 2004. Dr. Benninghoff then worked as a post-doctoral research associate at Oregon State University, where she received additional training in the areas of toxicology and carcinogenesis. Dr. Benninghoff is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, for which she teaches courses in endocrinology and science communication. She is also a faculty member of the USU School of Veterinary Medicine where she teaches components of veterinary physiology and directs the veterinary student research program. Dr. Benninghoff is an affiliate faculty member of the USTAR Applied Nutrition Research program, which has a research focus on gut microbiota, diet and health. Research in Dr. Benninghoff’s laboratory is multi-disciplinary, covering topics ranging from dietary bioactives and cancer to toxicology to genome reprogramming and epigenetics. A major goal of Dr. Benninghoff’s research program is to understand the influence of environmental factors on mechanisms of gene regulation in determining health and disease in animals and humans.

Amplify Your Teaching Impact: Capitalizing on 1-on-1 Instruction

With ever greater focus on the issues of expansive class sizes, electronic learning management systems, big data and digital tools in the classroom, we can lose focus on one of most effective tools in teaching: the 1-on-1 encounter. As instructors, we encourage our students to seek out opportunities to interact with their faculty 1-on-1, whether meeting with us during office hours, engaging in an honors project or performing research in the field. When used to their full potential, such interactions can set a student on a trajectory for personal and professional success. When handled poorly or with little care, these interactions can set a student on a wrong track or foster self-doubt and fear. Yet, given the great potential of these encounters for good or ill, we may not give 1-on-1 interactions the same careful consideration as class room settings with respect to developing learning objectives and providing individual feedback. Such interactions also provide essential opportunities to gauge the intellectual and emotional well being of our students, with some of whom we can expect to develop life-long professional partnerships.

In this session, I will share some of my experiences in 1-on-1 student instruction and my thoughts on ways to boost the impact of our individual interactions with students. My goal for this hour is to convince you of the importance of being deliberate in your 1-on-1 interactions with students, that by focusing on individual student goals and by being sensitive to student needs and perceptions, we can capitalize on 1-on-1 instruction to the benefit of both faculty and students.

Conference Schedule

Event
8:00 Registration and Check-In 
201 Ballroom - Taggart Student Center (view map)
9:00 – 9:15 Welcoming Remarks
Noelle Cockett
Executive Vice President & Provost
9:15 – 10:15 General Session Keynote - Amplify Your Teaching Impact: Capitalizing on 1-on-1 Instruction
Abby Benninghoff
Associate Professor, Animal Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
10:15
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10:20
Thanks and Conference Logistics
Travis Thurston
Senior Instructional Designer, Center for Innovative Design and Instruction
Breakout Sessions
10:30 – 11:05
The ABCs of XYZ Students
Kit Mohr, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Programs
Eric Mohr, Associate Professor
School of Teacher Education and Leadership, 
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
(201 Ballroom A)

Student Engagement

In this session, you will learn various psychological and social descriptions of current college-age students that will help you consider their perspectives and orientations to learning. You will interact with others to increase your understanding of instructional methods that can support their learning dispositions and acquisition of course content.
Online Student Engagement: A Few Things That Work
Ryan Seedall
Assistant Professor, 
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
(201 Ballroom B)

Student Engagement

In this session, you will learn four strategies that have been useful in enhancing student engagement in online courses. In this session, you will learn some of the benefits as well as some of the challenges for implementing these strategies in your courses. In this session, you will learn nuances that I have found enhance the effectiveness of these strategies.
Case Studies that Students Design
Adam Hunsaker
Professional Practice Assitant Professor, Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
(Auditorium, 227)

Student Engagement, Graduate Instructor Track

In this session, you will learn how to lead students to build their own case studies. That giving students freedom to determine the assignment topic leads to increased engagement.
Integrating Technology and Innovation in Education
Nathan Smith
Director of Technology Integration, Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
(Classroom, 335)

Student Engagement, Graduate Instructor Track

In this session, I will share ideas I've learned about focusing on the educational experience I want my students to have, how we work as a team and cohort, and how I try to provide real world experiences for them throughout the course.
Using Concept Maps to Gain Higher Order Student Learning Outcomes
David Law
Associate Professor, 
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
(Senate Champbers, 336)

Teaching and Learning Evaluation

In this session, you will learn how to construct concept maps, the theory underlying concept maps, how concept maps promote higher order learning, and how concept maps can be assessed.
Testing has Evolved
Kevin Shanley
Director of E-LearningAcademic and Instructional Services
(West Colony, 219)

Content/Resources/Tools

You will have the guidelines for deciding which tests should be proctored. You will know how to have tests proctored in the testing center. You will understand the differences between live proctoring and virtual proctoring.
USU Faculty-led Study Abroad Information Session
Janis Boettinger, Vice Provost, Director for Global Engagement and Professor, College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
Kay Forsyth, Study Abroad Program Coordinator
Katie Davidson, Study Abroad Advisor
(Center Colony, 221)


Course Design Strategies

Faculty-led study abroad programs can be developed for any discipline. Learn the steps involved to create a new program and gain insights from other experienced faculty leaders.
3D Design, Printing and Scanning
Kevin Reeve, Director of Teaching and Learning Technologies
Tyler Clair, Learning Tools Administrator
Academic and Instructional Services
(Conference Room, 25B)

Content/Resources/Tools

In this session you will learn: What you can do with 3D design, printing, and scanning. Examples of how some faculty are using this in their classrooms now. What software tools are available for design and scanning at USU. What 3D printers and facilities are available for use by faculty and students at USU.
Exhibit Booths
Breakout Sessions
11:15 – 11:50
Including Every Student in Your Classroom
Christopher Phillips
EIT Accessibliy Coordinator, Academic and Instructional Services
(201 Ballroom A)

Course Design Strategies, Graduate Instructor Track

• You will walk away from this session understanding how to improve the effectiveness of your course to meet the needs of all learners.
• You will learn techniques for creating course content that makes your course more usable and accessible.
Avoiding Inert Knowledge: Making Students the Subject of the Classroom
Mitchell Colver
Student Transitions Coordinator, Student Services
(201 Ballroom B)


Course Design Strategies, Graduate Instructor Track

In this session, participants will develop a shared language of pedagogy, curriculum development, and instructional planning. Participants will also be exposed to issues of formative assessment and reflective development of course material. Finally, the session will provide participants with a plan of course development to use over time.
Learning Analytics: Turning off the DRIP (Data Rich Info Poor)
Courtney Stewart
Assistant ProfessorEmma Eccles Jones College of Education & Human Services
(Auditorium, 227)


Teaching and Learning Evaluation

In this session you will learn what is Learning Analytics and the potential information it offers to guide our courses and programs. We will also discuss the problems that impede the use "Big Data" and what are some possible solutions in avoiding them.
Flipping Chemistry at a Distance
Mike Christiansen
Assistant ProfessorCollege of Science
(Classroom, 335)


Student Engagement

In this session, you will learn strategies for engaging distance students in flipped courses that are simultaneously broadcast to multiple geographic sites.
Worked Examples and Faded Scaffolds
Colby Tofel-GrehlAssistant Professor
David Feldon, Associate Professor
Emma Eccles Jones College of Education & Human Services
(Senate Champbers, 336)


Teaching and Learning Evaluation

In this session you will learn the research basis and hands on skills for using faded scaffolds in your classes. Faded scaffolding allows instructors to develop student independence in their learning by creating structures safe opportunities to develop both procedural and conceptual knowledge bases.
Lessons Learned from Mentoring an Undergraduate Intern funded by the Student Internship Grant
Maya Miyairi
Assistant ProfessorEmma Eccles Jones College of Education & Human Services
(West Colony, 219)


Student Engagement

In this presentation, you will learn 1) the process of the grant submission, 2), the presenter’s project outcome report based on the SIG grant, and 3) Dos and Don'ts when you hire a student intern.
USU Analytics Initiative and Civitas
John Louviere
Assistant Dean, Director of the Center for Innovative Design and InstructionAcademic and Instructional Services
(Center Colony, 221)


Teaching and Learning Evaluation

Participants will learn about USU analytics initatives. In addition, information about Civitas Learning tools, designed to assist Faculty and Advisors with retention and advising tasks, will be presented and discussed.
Unique and Innovative Approach to Student Engagement through Objective Oriented Active Learning
Debra Jenson
Assistant ProfessorCollege of Humanities and Social Sciences
(Conference Room, 25B)


Content/Resources/Tools

In this session participants will learn from a teaching sample and leave with helpful knowledge and resources to create a similar lesson in their own classroom.
Course Outline
Exhibit Booths
12:00 – 1:00:   Networking Lunch
Breakout Sessions
1:00 – 1:35
Knowledge Masters: Online Educational Gaming for Your Classroom
Clayton Brown
Assistant ProfessorCollege of Humanities and Social Sciences
(201 Ballroom A)


Content/Resources/Tools

This session demonstrates how to use a free Canvas application designed by USU faculty that allows students in your class to compete in an educational online game featuring material from your course. Students automatically receive credit for playing the game, but rankings on the leaderboard motivate students to master any content you choose.
Creative Confidence in the Classroom
Dan Holland
Associate ProfessorJon M Huntsman School of Business
(201 Ballroom B)


Student Engagement

In this session, you will learn principles and techniques to improve your creativity in developing classroom exercises, instructional methods, and other content for your courses. In addition, creative teaching techniques will be modeled and shared.
Engaging Students through Online Polling
Chris Hartwell
Assistant Professor, 
Jon M Huntsman School of Business
(Auditorium, 227)

Content/Resources/Tools, Graduate Instructor Track

In this session, you will learn how to create and administer various types of questions using Poll Everywhere (www.polleverywhere.com), and how this resource can be utilized to increase student engagement and class participation.
Engaging Students Through Real-Life Problems
Rodney Marchant
LecturerCollege of Humanities and Social Sciences
(Classroom, 335)


Student Engagement, Graduate Instructor Track

The audience will leave with an understanding of the importance of problem based learning and several examples of how to use pbl in their classrooms.
Using Somebody Else's Wheel in Course Design
Cynthia Gibson
LecturerJon M Huntsman School of Business
(Senate Champbers, 336)


Course Design Strategies

In this session you will learn how to approach course design/redesign through extant resources that can be financed through an RCAIS ETL grant.
Supporting Success through Mentoring
Susan Talley
Associate ProfessorEmma Eccles Jones College of Education & Human Services
(West Colony, 219)


Content/Resources/Tools

In this session you will learn the current literature in mentorship and criteria for successful mentoring Discussions about how we can successfully mentor each other will be addressed and evaluated. This is an action-oriented discussion. The outcome desired is to get senior faculty and junior faculty together to develop a successful strategy for mentorship through the tenure and promotion process.
Does Everyone Look Bored? Engage your Students, Refresh your Research Assignments!
Kacy Lundstrom, Coordinator of Library Instruction
Dory Cochran and Rachel Wishkoski, 
Reference & Instruction Librarians
Libraries
(Center Colony, 221)


Student Engagement

In this session you will be introduced to numerous examples of creative and authentic research assignments for a variety of disciplines. You will also engage in discussions about students’ struggles with research and how we can target our assignments to support them through difficult stages of the research process.
Exhibit Booths
Breakout Sessions
1:45 – 2:20
Ditch Your Textbook: Getting Started with Open Educational Resources
Erin Davis
Library Coordinator of Regional Campuses & ElearningLibraries
(201 Ballroom A)


Content/Resources/Tools, Graduate Instructor Track

In this session, you will learn how to locate high quality open educational resources, the benefits of adopting OER, and ways that the Library can help you successfully integrate more OER in your curriculum.
Tablets in IVC Classroom
Piotr Runge
LecturerCollege of Science
(201 Ballroom B)


Student Engagement

In this session, you will learn how to use tablets in IVC classes to engage students and let them show their written work visible to only the instructor or all students in real time.
Things I Never Knew...Until I Taught Without a Syllabus
John Engler
Senior Lecturer,College of Humanities and Social Sciences
(Auditorium, 227)


Course Design Strategies

Teaching without a syllabus is not an approach everyone has the chance to try, this presentation lets teachers in on what it was like, what worked well, what didn’t, and where there is more discussion, research, and experimentation needed.
TAKE OFF! How to make your Canvas course more exciting!
Andreas Wesseman
Assistant ProfessorCollege of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
(Classroom, 335)


Course Design Strategies, Graduate Instructor Track

This interactive workshop will help you go from idea to reality, in how to take any course and make it more exciting. Bring your device and dream big! Learn simple strategies to draw your students in--especially for your online courses.
No lab, no money, no problem! Making an ETLG work for lecturers and their students in the sciences
Jessica Habashi
Senior LecturerCollege of Science
(Senate Champbers, 336)


Teaching and Learning Evaluation

Participants will see how an ETLG can support curriculum development in the sciences while creating opportunities to mentor students and promote their academic development through participation at conferences and writing for publication. In short, you will learn why you should apply for an ETLG!
Two Ways to Help Students – and Yourself – With Course Assignments
Dan McInerney
ProfessorCollege of Humanities and Social Sciences
(West Colony, 219)


Content/Resources/Tools

In this session, participants will: examine a broad collection of peer-reviewed course assignments across a range of disciplines, learn of ways to conduct an “assignment workshop” with your own colleagues, review the structure and wording of thoughtful “rubrics” for evaluating student exercises, and in all of this work, transform our teaching from a focus on “my course” to “our curriculum.”
Service Learning in the Community
Kristin Brubaker, Community Engagement Specialist, Center for Civic Engagement and Service-Learning
Jason Leiker, Senior Lecturer, College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sonia Manuel-Dupont, Associate Professor, Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services
Robert Schmidt, Associate Professor, S.J. and Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources
Tammy Steinitz, Director of Dietetics Program, Clinical Professor, College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
(Center Colony, 221)


Course Design Strategies

This session will provide a brief overview of Service-Learning at USU and hear from a faculty panel on successful approaches to Service-Learning in a range of disciplines. Attendees should leave the session with a deeper understanding of how to blend Service-Learning into their classrooms.
 Exhibit Booths
Closing
2:30 – 3:00 Closing - Wrap Up
Robert Wagner
Executive Vice Provost & Dean, Academic and Instructional Services

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